Blogs

By Peter Ndahiro

Working in the creation of A/V (Audio Visual) materials requires a lot of observation. In this particular field, this means listening to personal testimonies from the wounded, whether it be a group of kids at a high school in Kigali, or a group of mothers at a community centre in Rwamagana.

By Alex Rijpma

For the past three years, I studied World Politics at Leiden University College in The Hague. I came out of that experience unsure of what exactly I wanted to do but feeling like I wanted to see how the topics that I learnt about could really be applied in society. I found an opportunity to pursue this instinct through an internship at Never Again Rwanda.

 

By Kezio-Musoke David

Sometimes, social media is used to de-escalate and prevent violence, although in the case of NAR it is becoming easy for one to find a clear, connection between social media use and peace building.

 

By Mikhaila Cupido Musoni 

In celebrating International Day of Democracy, being located in Africa, and having a mandate to serve the African people, we as the African Democracy Forum (ADF) focus on the progress of democracy on the continent. 

By Sonia Tona

The first time I heard about Isoko performing arts, was through a friend  who is actually the founder. Amina was my high school friend we had met in acting club at school.

By Derrick Murekezi

As Rwandans, there’s never been a better time to be alive. Everyday brings with it another opportunity to talk about Rwanda’s rise from economic ruin, to being a regional and international leader in gender equality.

 

By David Kezio-Musoke

During conflicts youth are more likely to be manipulated into committing crimes against humanity partly due to lack of skills to make informed decisions. 

In February 2017, I was fortunate to be selected to participate in a training program carried by the Peace Building Institute in Kigali, Rwanda.

By Jayden Bott

This summer I was given the amazing opportunity to attend the Peacebuilding Institute (PBI). Going into it, I did not know much about the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi.

By Teddy Gatali Mucyo 

In 1994, the international community looked on as a million people were killed in three months.  The international community utterly failed to prevent and stop this atrocity. 

It has been twenty three years since the 1994 genocide perpetrated against the Tutsis occurred but too many it seems like yesterday.

As the world joins the Rwandans in the 100 days of morning (Kwibuka) to commemorate the 23 years since the infamous 1994 Genocide perpetuated again